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Timeline Ideas

Every Man a King - Huey Long Timeline

  • FDR Dies of a Stroke in August of 1935, butterflying away the assassination of Huey Long, and setting in motion the events of the Timeline.
    • Long wins a 3-Way Presidential Election against Garner and Landon.
  • 1936 - Long/Farley (Populist) vs Gardner/? (Democrat) vs Landon/Knox (Republican)
  • 1940 - Long/Farley (Democrat (disputed)) vs Willkie/Vanderbilt (Republican) vs Gardner/Barkley (Democrat (disputed))
  • 1944 - Long/Farley (Democrat/Populist) vs Roosevelt/Green (Republican)
  • 1948 - Long/(Henry) Wallace (LEF) vs Farley/Stassen (Democratic Union) vs McArthur/(Howard) Buffet (Conservative) vs Thurmond/Wright (Dixiecrat)


2022 United States Senate election in Missouri (Beau Lives)

Biden Campaign

First Campaign Staff: Valerie Biden Owens (Campaign Manager), Ted Kaufman (Campaign Chairman and Treasurer), Steve Richetti (Executive Director and Deputy Campaign Manager), Jen O'Malley Dillon (Director of Data Analytics and Deputy Campaign Manager), Kweisi Mfume (Political Director and Deputy Campaign Manager).

Current Cabinet of Joe Biden

Cabinet of President Joe Biden
Office
Date announced / confirmed
Designee Office
Date announced / confirmed
Designee

Vice President of the United States
Announced July 27, 2016
Elected November 8, 2016
Assumed office January 20, 2017


Former U.S. Senator
Elizabeth Warren
of Massachusetts

Secretary of State
Announced January 3, 2021
Assumed office February 19, 2021


Former Under Secretary for COVID-19 Response Managment
Tom Perriello
of Virginia

Secretary of the Treasury
Announced November 30, 2020
Assumed office January 26, 2021


Former Former Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
Richard Cordray
of Ohio

Secretary of Defense
Announced December 8, 2020
Assumed office January 22, 2021


Former Secretary of Homeland Security
Jeh Johnson
of New York

Attorney General
Announced January 7, 2021
Assumed office March 11, 2021


Former Circuit Judge
Merrick Garland
of Maryland

Secretary of the Interior
Announced December 17, 2020
Assumed office March 16, 2021


Former U.S. Representative
Deb Haaland
of New Mexico

Secretary of Agriculture
Announced December 10, 2020
Assumed office February 24, 2021


Former Secretary
Tom Vilsack
of Iowa

Secretary of Commerce
Announced January 7, 2021
Assumed office March 3, 2021


Former Governor
Gina Raimondo
of Rhode Island

Secretary of Labor
Announced January 7, 2021
Assumed office March 23, 2021


Former Mayor
Marty Walsh
of Massachusetts

Secretary of Health and Human Services
Announced December 7, 2020
Assumed office March 19, 2021


Former California Attorney General
Xavier Becerra
of California

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Announced December 10, 2020
Assumed office March 10, 2021


Former U.S. Representative
Marcia Fudge
of Ohio

Secretary of Transportation
Announced December 15, 2020
Assumed office February 3, 2021


Former Mayor
Pete Buttigieg
of Indiana

Secretary of Energy
Announced December 17, 2020
Assumed office February 25, 2021


Former Governor
Jennifer Granholm
of Michigan

Secretary of Education
Announced December 22, 2020
Assumed office March 2, 2021


Former Education Commissioner
Miguel Cardona
of Connecticut

Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Announced December 10, 2020
Assumed office February 9, 2021


Former White House Chief of Staff
Denis McDonough
of Maryland

Secretary of Homeland Security
Announced November 23, 2020
Assumed office February 2, 2021


Former Deputy Secretary
Alejandro Mayorkas
of the District of Columbia

Cabinet-level officials

Office

Date announced / confirmed

Designee Office

Date announced / confirmed

Designee

Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency
Announced December 17, 2020
Assumed office March 11, 2021


Former Secretary of Environmental Quality
Michael S. Regan
of North Carolina

Director of the Office of Management and Budget
Announced March 2, 2021
Assumed office March 24, 2021


Deputy Director
Shalanda Young
of Louisiana

Director of National Intelligence
Announced November 23, 2020
Assumed office January 21, 2021


Former Deputy National Security Advisor
Avril Haines
of New York

United States Trade Representative
Announced December 10, 2020
Assumed office March 18, 2021


Former Chief Trade Counsel of the House Ways and Means Committee
Katherine Tai
of the District of Columbia

United States Ambassador to the United Nations
Announced November 23, 2020
Assumed office February 25, 2021


Former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
Linda Thomas-Greenfield
of Louisiana

Chair of the Council of Economic Advisors
Announced November 30, 2020
Assumed office March 12, 2021


Former Dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs
Cecilia Rouse
of New Jersey

Administrator of the Small Business Administration
Announced January 7, 2021
Assumed office March 17, 2021


Former Director of the Office of Small Business Advocate
Isabel Guzman
of California

Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy
Science Advisor to the President
Announced January 15, 2021
Assumed office June 2, 2021


Former Director of the Broad Institute
Eric Lander
of Massachusetts

White House Chief of Staff
Announced November 12, 2020
Assumed office January 20, 2021


Former Chief of Staff to the Vice President
Ron Klain
of Indiana

Other high-level positions

High-level Officials
Office Nominee Term begins

Counselor to the President
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

National Security Advisor

Avril Haines
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

Director of the National Economic Council
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

Director of the Domestic Policy Council
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

White House Press Secretary
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

White House Director of Communications
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)

White House Counsel
January 20, 2017
(without Senate confirmation)
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of National Intelligence

Tom Donilon
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the Central Intelligence Agency

Mark Warner
pending Senate confirmation

Secretary of the Army

Eric Fanning
in office

Secretary of the Navy

Ray Mabus
in office

Secretary of the Air Force

Deborah Lee James
in office

Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Administrator of the Federal Highway Administration
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Administrator of NASA
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the National Science Foundation
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Director of the United States Office of Personnel Management
Upon United States Senate confirmation

Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development
Upon United States Senate confirmation

2024 Presidential Election

Nominations

Democratic Primary

Publicly expressed interest

As of July 2021, individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the previous six months.

Republican Primary

Random One Shots

New England Presidential Election

2004 United States presidential election
Template:Country data United States
← 2000 Template:Start date 2008 →

All 538 electoral votes of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win

 
Nominee George W. Bush John Kerry
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Texas Massachusetts
Running mate Richard B. Cheney John Edwards
Electoral vote 251
States carried 19 + DC
Popular vote 62,040,610 59,028,444
Percentage 50.7% 48.3%

Presidential election results map

President before election

George W. Bush
Republican Party (US)

Elected President

George W. Bush
Republican Party (US)

2017 MA Special Election

Gen Election - April 11, 2017 Primary - February 28, 2017 768,931 Dem primary votes 217.686 Rep Primary Votes

2017 United States Senate special election in Massachusetts

← 2012 April 11, 2017 2018 →

 
Nominee Sonia Chang Díaz Jim Lyons Jr. Bill Weld
(write in)
Party Democratic Republican Independent Republican
Popular vote 1,086,266 947,920 169,756
Percentage 48.76% 42.55% 7.62%

Municipality results

U.S. Senator before election

Bill Weld
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Sonia Chang-Díaz
Democratic

2,227,780 gen election votes Shiva - 1.07% Weld - 7.62% Lyons - 42.55% Chang Diaz - 48.76%

Democratic Primary

Following the Biden/Warren ticket's election to the Presidency and Vice Presidency, Senator Elizabeth Warren announced her intention to resign from her seat in the U.S. Senate, as required by U.S. law. Speculation about her possible replacements began before the election, with Congressman Joe Kennedy, Attorney General Maura Healey, and Congressman Seth Moutlon being identified as early frontrunners. When Kennedy and Healey declined to be candidates, the field expanded significantly, swelling to over 19 declared candidates. Political analysts cited shifting demographics, excited activists, and the open nature of the seat as reasons for the crowded field.

In the early parts of the campaign, Congressman Moulton, State Treasurer Deb Goldberg, and former State Treasurer Steven Grossman where identified as the top three candidates. Moulton was endorsed by a number of his house colleges, including several serving from Massachusetts, as well as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, but struggled to gain traction among the state's local democratic committees. Treasurer Goldberg billed herself as the "Massachusetts candidate" citing her strong support from local officials and municipal democratic committees, and accusing Moulton of being tainted by his experience in Washington. Grossman, Goldberg's predecessor as Treasurer, gained large support from the party's progressive wing, and his campaign was boosted by an endorsement from U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders.

As election day drew closer, the race became more "multipolar" and a number of smaller candidates gained increased traction. In the last pre-primary poll, Moulton, Goldberg, and Grossman were tied for first with Chang-Diaz, Khazei, and Warren within the margin of error. With "massive" turnout, State Senator Chang-Diaz won in a political upset, earning 16.73% of the primary vote totaling 113,000 votes and beating her nearest competitor, Treasurer Goldberg, earning 16.29% of the vote totaling 109,000. The thin margin lead to multiple recounts, although Diaz declared victory the following day, her victory was not confirmed by election officials until March 9, more than one week following the primary. Goldberg conceded the following day on March 10.

Chang-Díaz's victory is attributed to a strong ground game in the City of Boston and support from activists and community leaders. She also received a boon of support from younger and minority communities. She placed first among the state's Hispanic and African American populations, and third among Asian and Pacific Islander's. Among younger voters, she placed second behind Grossman and above Moulton. She was the first woman of color to win a state wide race in Massachusetts.

Candidates

Nominee

  • Sonia Chang-Díaz, Massachusetts State Senator from the 2nd Suffolk District since 2009

Declared

  • Seth Moulton, U.S. Representative from MA-06 since 2015
  • Setti Warren, Mayor of Newton, MA, candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2012
  • Alan Khazei, Co-founder and former CEO of City Year, candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2010
  • Deb Goldberg, Massachusetts State Treasurer since 2015
  • Steven Grossman, former Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts, former chair of the Democratic National Convention, and candidate for Governor in 2014
  • Matt Patrick, former state Representative, 2001 - 2011
  • Jeffrey Ballinger, labor organizer and author
  • Barry Finegold, former Massachusetts State Senator, 2011 - 2015
  • Lisa Wong, former Mayor of Fitchburg, MA
  • Joseph Avellone, businessman and former member of the Wellesley Board of selectmen
  • Dan Wolf, former Massachusetts State Senator, 2011 - 2017
  • Rick Sullivan, former chief of staff to Governor Deval Patrick
  • Shannon Liss-Riordan, labor attorney
  • Evan Falchuck, former independent candidate for Governor in 2014.

Withdrawn

  • Matt O'Malley, Boston City Councilor (endorsed Chan-Díaz)
  • Stephen Lynch, U.S. Representative from MA-08 since 2001
  • Juliette Kayyem, former Assistant U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security for Intergovernmental Affairs and candidate for Governor in 2014
  • Steven C. Panagiotakos, former Massachusetts State Senator, 1997 - 2011
  • Evandro Carvalho, Massachusetts State Representative from the 5th Suffolk District since 2014 (endorsed Chang-Diaz, remained on ballot)

Declined

  • Joe Kennedy III, U.S. Representative from MA-04 since 2013
  • Maura Healy, Massachusetts Attorney General since 2015
  • Marty Walsh, Mayor of Boston since 2014
  • Deval Patrick, Attorney General of the United States and former Governor of Massachusetts


Republican Primary

Speculation regarding Baker's appointment began after the Presidential victory of the Biden/Warren. The selection was seen as an "identity crisis" for the Massachusetts Republican Party, with the party split between a more conservative pro-Donald Trump faction and a more moderate faction. Baker's decision was widely viewed as a turning point in which wing of the party he would settle in. By mid-December, Baker had stated that he "was forming a shortlist and soliciting input" from members of his party. The following week, he said that the final choice was narrowed down to four candidates, but he declined to note which four.

Throughout the process, much of the speculation centered around former Governor Bill Weld, Baker's political mentor, and Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. Although both were close allies of Baker, although Polito was considered the more conservative of the two options. When asked, Polito declined to comment, and Weld stated that he had "been contacted" about the possibility. Bradley Jones Jr., a state representative and Minority Leader of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, urged Baker to pick Polito as a "compromise candidate" while also denying interest in the position. Worcester County Sherriff Lewis Evangelidis, vocally criticized both Weld and Polito, and urged Baker to pick a more conservative replacement.

On January 2, 2017, Warren formalized her resignation for January 9, 2017, and urged Baker to announce a replacement "as soon as possible." On January 5, 2017, Baker announced Weld as his replacement for Warren. In a press conference announcing the decision, Weld stated that he "vehemently disagreed" with Senator Warren, but that he had the upmost respect for her. The move immediately drew critisim from conservatives in the state, with State Rep. Geoff Diehl calling Weld's appointment "a massive betrayal." Almost immediately, GOP leaders within the state began discussing the possibility of a conservative alternative, with both Diehl and Evangelidis soliciting interest in campaigns. Ultiumatley, conservative leaders would rally around Jim Lyons Jr., a state representative and ally to Donald Trump. In his announcement, Lyons called Weld a "Democrat in Republican skin" and accused Weld of supporting President Biden in 2016. Several more candidates would jump into the race, including Kevin O'Connor, a Boston-based attorney.

The primary campaign was incredibly competitive, with both candidates raising large amounts of money and receiving support from out-of-state politicians. Lyons repeatedly criticized Weld's votes for a number of Biden's nominees, and Weld characterized Lyons as an ideologue out of step with Massachusetts voters. Three days before the Primary, on February 25, 2016 GOP nominee Donald Trump endorsed Lyons. At a rally, Trump called Lyons "the only real Republican" in Massachusetts politics, and attacked Baker and Weld for a perceived alliance with President Biden. Following the rally, Lyons raised 1.1 million dollars from donors across the country, the largest single day hall in Massachusetts history and nearly a third of the total 3.7 million Lyons raised during the primary. Ultimately, Lyons would pull off an upset, winning with 48.52% of the vote to Weld's 47.91%, with O'Connor earning 2.56% of the vote in a distant third.

Given the close nature of the race, finalizing the result took several days. Weld initially refused to concede, and wanted to wait until the official results where certified. Lyons criticized the decision, and argued that Baker would try and "screw" him out of the election. A number of Republican leaders criticized Lyons accusations, but he refused to retract them. On March 4, Baker urged Weld to consider running as a write in candidate. The next day, Weld declared his intentions to continue running as a write in candidate, and was endorsed by Baker and the Libertarian Party of Massachusetts. Lyons filed suit to bar Weld from running in the general election, but the case was dismissed.

Candidates

Nominee

  • James "Jim" J. Lyons Jr., State Representative

Eliminated in the Primary

  • Bill Weld, appointed U.S. senator, former Governor of Massachusetts, 1991 - 1997, nominee for U.S. Senate in 1996, and Libertarian nominee for Vice President in 2016.
  • Kevin O'Connor, attorney

Withdrawn

  • Andrew Lelling, attorney (endorsed Lyons)
  • V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai, tech entrepreneur and conspiracy theorist (running as an independent)

Declined

  • Charlie Baker, incumbent Governor since 2015 (endorsed Weld)
  • Karyn Polito, incumbent Lieutenant Governor since 2015 (endorsed Weld)
  • Bradley Jones Jr., Minority Leader of the Massachusetts House of Representatives since 2002.
  • Lewis Evangelidis, Worcester County Sheriff since 2011, former state representative, 2003 - 2011. (endorsed Lyons)

2018 Senate Elections Outline

2018 Elections

Governor

Going to be as in OTL unless otherwise noted:

  • Alaska - Possibly Justify a Mark Begich victory? Biden gets him into the race early and consolidate Democratic Support. Party pushes some money towards Walker to try and split the republican vote? Revisit Later.
  • Arizona - Sinema overperforms versus Ward, but not enough. Ducey still wins re-election, but down ballot democrats still see some success.
  • Florida - Ron DeSantis runs for Senate instead (maybe, still deciding), leaving Adam Putnam as the only major candidate.
  • Hawaii - Ige is appointed to serve as Ambassador to Japan. Hanabusa defeats Green in the Primary
  • Illinois - Biss wins (how to avoid Pritzker?)

Senate

2016

  • Alabama - Sen. Richard Shelby (R) def. Ron Crumpton (D)
  • Alaska - Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) def. Joe Miller(L) , Margaret Stock(I), Ray Metcalfe (D)
  • Arizona - Sen. John McCain (R) def. Ann Kirkpatrick (D), Gary Swing (G), Kelli Ward (R)
  • Arkansas - Sen. John Boozman (R) def. fmr. USDA Conner Eldridge (D)
  • California - State A.G. Kamala Harris (D) def. Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D)
  • Colorado - Sen. Michael Bennet (D) def. Commis. Darryl Glenn (R)
  • Connecticut - Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D) def. State Rep. Dan Carter (R)
  • Florida - Sen. Marco Rubio (R) def. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D)
  • Georgia - Sen. Johnny Isakson (R) def. Jim Barksdale (D)
  • Hawaii - Sen. Brian Schatz (D) def. Fmr. State Sen. John Carroll (R)
  • Idaho - Sen. Mike Crapo (R) def. Jerry Sturgill (D) and Ray Writz (C)
  • Illinois - Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D) def. Sen. Mark Kirk (Flip)
  • Indiana - Rep. Todd Young (R) def. fmr. Sen. Evan Bayh (D)
  • Iowa - Sen. Chuck Grassley (R) def. fmr. Lt. Gov. Patty Judge (D)
  • Kansas - Sen. Jerry Moran (R) def. Patrick Wiesner (D) and Robert Garrard (L)
  • Kentucky - Sen. Rand Paul (R) def. May. Jim Gray (D)
  • Louisiana - State Tres. John Neely Kennedy (R) def. Commis. Foster Campbell (D)
  • Maryland - Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D) def. State Del. Kathy Szeliga (R)
  • Missouri - State Sec. of State Jason Kander (D) def. Sen. Roy Blunt (R) (Flip) (Tipping Point State)
  • Nevada - Fmr. State A.G. Catherine Cortez Masto (D) def. Rep. Joe Heck
  • New Hampshire - Gov. Maggie Hassan (D) def. Sen. Kelly Ayotte (Flip)
  • New York - Sen. Chuck Schumer (D) def. Wendy Long (R)
  • North Carolina - Fmr. State Rep. Deborah K. Ross (D) def. Sen. Richard Burr (R) (FLip)
  • North Dakota - Sen. John Hoeven (R) def. Eliot Glassheim (D)
  • Ohio - Sen. Rob Portman (R) def. Fmr. Gov. Ted Strickland (D)
  • Oklahoma - Sen. James Lankford (R) def. Mike Workman (D)
  • Oregon - Sen. Ron Wyden (D) def. City Councilor Mark Callahan (R)
  • Pennsylvania - Kate McGinty (D) def. Sen. Pat Toomey (R) (Flip)
  • South Carolina - Sen. Tim Scott (R) def. Thomas Dixon (D)
  • South Dakota - Sen. John Thune (R) def. Jay Williams (D)
  • Utah - Sen. Mike Lee (R) def. Misty Snow (D)
  • Vermont - Sen. Patrick Leahy (D) def. Scott Milne (R)
  • Washington - Sen. Patty Murray (D) def. Chris Vance (R)
  • Wisconsin - Fmr. Sen. Russ Feingold (D) def. Sen. Ron Johnson (R) (Flip)

Final - 50D-48R-2I House - 234R - 201D

  • Republican Nomination - Speaker Paul Ryan def. Rep. Mark Meadows 197-37
    • Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy def. Rep. Jim Jordan 141-93
    • Majority Whip Steve Scalise re-elected unopposed
  • Democratic Nomination - Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi def. Rep. Tim Ryan 136-65
    • Minority Whip Steny Hoyer unopposed
    • Assistant Majority Leader Jim Clyburn unopposed

2018

Pre-Election: 26D-39R-0I

  • Arizona - Rep. Krysten Sinema (D) def. State Sen. Kelli Ward (R) (Flip) (tipping point state)
  • California - Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) def. State Sen. Kevin De Leon (D)
  • Connecticut - Sen. Chris Murphy (D) def. James P. Bradley (R)
  • Delaware - Sen. Tom Carper (D) def. Rob Arlett (R)
  • Florida - Sen. Bill Nelson (D) def. Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera (R)
  • Hawaii - Sen. Mazie Hirono (D) def. Ron Curtis (R)
  • Indiana - Sen. Joe Donnelly (D) def. Rep. Todd Rokita (R)
  • Maine - Sen. Angus King (I) def. State Sen. Eric Brakey (R) and Zak Ringelstein (D)
  • Maryland - Sen. Ben Cardin (D) def. Tony Campbell (R)
  • Massachusetts - Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz (D) def. Fmr. State. Rep. Geoff Diehl (R)
  • Michigan - Sen. Debbi Stabenow (D) def. John James (R)
  • Minnesota - Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D) def. State Rep. Jim Newberger (R)
  • Minnesota special - Sen. Tina Smith (D) def. State Sen. Karin Housley (R)
  • Mississippi - Sen. Roger Wicker (R) def. State Rep. David Baria (D)
  • Mississippi special - State Sen. Chris McDaniel (R) def. fmr. Sec. of Agriculture Mike Espy (D) and Sen. Cindy Hyde Smith (R)
  • Missouri - State A.G. Josh Hawley (R) def. Sen Claire McCaskill (D) (Flip)
  • Montana - Sen. Jon Tester (D) def. State Audi. Matt Rosendale (R)
  • Nebraska - Sen. Deb Fischer (R) def. City Councilor Jane Raybould (D)
  • Nevada - Rep. Jacky Rosen (D) def. Sen. Dean Heller (R) (Flip)
  • New Jersey - Sen. Bob Menendez (D) def. Bob Hugin (R)
  • New Mexico - Sen. Martin Heinrich (D) def. Mick Rich (R) and fmr. Gov. Gary Johnson (L)
  • New York - Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D) def. Chele Chiavacci Farley (R)
  • North Dakota - Rep. Kevin Cramer (R) def. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D) (Flip)
  • Ohio - Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) def. Rep. Jim Renacci (R)
  • Pennsylvania - Sen. Bob Casey Jr. (D) def. Rep. Lou Barletta (R)
  • Rhode Island - Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D) def. State Justice Robert Flanders (R)
  • Tennessee - Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R) def. James Mackler (D)
  • Texas - Sen. Ted Cruz (R) def. Sema Hernandez (D)
  • Utah - Fmr. MA Gov. Mitt Romney (R) def. City Councilor Jenny Wilson (D)
  • Vermont - Sen. Bernie Sanders (I) def. Lawrence Zupan (R)
  • Virginia - Sen. Tim Kaine (D) def. State Del. Nick Freitas (R)
  • Washington - Sen. Maria Cantwell def. Susan Hutchinson (R)
  • West Virginia - Sen. Joe Manchin (D) def. Rep. Evan Jenkins (R)
  • Wisconsin - Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D) def. State Sen. Leah Vukmir (R)
  • Wyoming - Sen. John Barrasso (R) def. Gary Trauner (D)

Final - 50D-48R-2I (No Net Change)

House

House - 238R - 197D (R+4)

  • Republican Nomination - Maj. Leader Kevin McCarthy def. Rep. Jim Jordan 196-42
    • Majority Whip Steve Scalise elected Majority Leader unopposed
    • Cathy McMorris Rodgers elected Majority Whip unopposed
      • Ryan is either retired or ousted from the position
  • Democratic Nomination - Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi reelected 184-13 abstentions
    • Minority Whip Steny Hoyer unopposed
    • Assistant Majority Leader Jim Clyburn unopposed
  • Speaker Election:
    • First Ballot
      • Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi - 165
      • Maj. Leader Kevin McCarthy - 162
      • Rep. Jim Jordan - 47
      • Rep. Tim Ryan - 28
      • Speaker Paul Ryan - 27
      • Rep. Daniel Webster - 3
      • Fmr. Sec. State Colin Powell - 2
      • Rep. John Lewis - 1
    • Second Ballot:
      • Maj. Whip Steve Scalise - 222
      • Min. Leader Nancy Pelosi - 172
      • Rep. Tim Ryan - 25
      • Rep. Jim Jordan - 16
  • Scalise's Concessions: To be elected Speaker, Scalise and the party broker the following agreement:
    • Three term limit applied to all leadership positions, including Speaker. An individual may hold more than three terms in a particular position only after three terms off.
    • A new leadership position, Deputy Speaker, will be created, and House Republicans will back a "conservative" for the position (Freedom Caucus picked candidate)
    • RCCC will have three co-chairs, at least one of which will be a Freedom Caucus member
  • New House Leadership Team:
  • Speaker - Steve Scalise (R)
    • Majority Leader - Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) (McCarthy resigns after losing Speakership vote)
    • Deputy Speaker - Trey Gowdy (R-SC)
    • Majority Whip - Ryan Zinke (R-MT)
    • Conference Chair - Liz Cheney (R-WY)
    • Conference Vice Chair - Elise Stefanik (R-NY)
    • Conference Secretary - Richard Hudson (R-NC)
    • Campaign Committee Co-Chairs - Tom Emmer (R-NC), Jim Jordan (R-OH) and David Schweikert (R-AZ)

2020

Pre Election Count - 38D-25R-2I

  • Alabama - Sen. Jeff Sessions (R) def. fmr. Mayor Brandaun Dean (D)
  • Alaska - Sen. Dan Sullivan (R) def. Dr. Al Gross (I)
  • Arizona special - Mark Kelly (D) def. Sen. Martha McSally (R) (flip)
  • Arkansas - Sen. Tom Cotton (R) def. Ricky Harrington Jr. (L)
  • Colorado - Fmr. State House Speaker Andrew Romanoff (D) def. Sen. Corey Gardner (R) (flip)
  • Delaware - Sen. Chris Coons (D) def. Lauren Witzke (R)
  • Georgia - Raphael Warnock (D) def. Sen. David Perdue (R) (flip)
  • Idaho - Sen. Jim Risch (R) def. State Rep. Paulette Jordan (D)
  • Illinois - Sen. Dick Durbin (D) def. fmr. Sheriff Mark Curran (R) and Willie Wilson (WW)
  • Iowa - State Rep. Abby Finkenauer (D) def. Sen. Joni Ernst (R) (flip)
  • Kansas - Rep. Roger Marshall (R) def. fmr. Rep. Nancy Boyda (D)
  • Kentucky - Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) def. Amy McGrath (D)
  • Louisiana - Sen. Bill Cassidy (R) def. May. Adrian Perkins (D)
  • Maine - State Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap (D) def. Sen. Susan Collins (R) (flip)
  • Massachusetts - Sen. Ed Markey (D) def. Kevin O'Connor (R)
  • Michigan - Sen. Gary Peters (D) def. John James (R)
  • Minnesota - Sen. Tina Smith (D) def. fmr. Rep Jason Lewis (R) and Kevin O'Connor (LMN)
  • Mississippi - Sen. Chris McDaniel (R) def. fmr. Sec. Agri. Mike Espy (D)
  • Montana - Sen. Steve Danies def. Mayor Wilmot Collins
  • Nebraska - Fmr. State Sen. Theresa Thibodeau (R) def. Chris Janieck (D), Preston Love Jr. (D), and Gene Siadek (L)
  • New Hampshire - Fmr. Commiss. Chris Sununu (R) def. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D) (flip)
  • New Jersey - Sen. Cory Booker (D) def. Rik Mehta (R)
  • New Mexico - Xochitl Torres Small (D) def. Mark Ronchetti (R)
  • North Carolina - Joan Higginbotham (D) def. Sen. Thom Tillis (R) (flip)
  • Oklahoma - State AG Scott Pruitt (R) def. Abby Broyles (D)
  • Oregon - Sen. Jeff Merkley (D) def. Jo Rae Perkins (R)
  • Rhode Island - Sen. Jack Reed (D) def. Allen Waters (R)
  • South Carolina - Sen. Lindsey Graham (R) def. Jamie Harrison (D)
  • South Dakota - Sen. Mike Rounds (R) def. State Rep. Dan Ahlers (D)
  • Tennessee - Fmr. Sen. Bob Corker (R) def. James Mackler (D)
  • Texas - Sen. John Cornyn (R) def. MJ Hegar (D)
  • Virginia - Sen. Mark Warner (D) def. Daniel Gade (R)
  • West Virginia - Sen. Shelly Moore Capito (R) def. State Sen. Richard Ojeda (D)
  • Wyoming - Fmr. Gov. Matt Mead (R) def. Merav Ben-David (D)

Final Count - 55D-43R-2I

House

House Count - 222D - 213R (D+25)

  • Democratic Nomination - Minority Leader Jim Clyburn nominated for Speaker, 184-36 over Rep. Pramila Jayapal
    • Minority Whip Steny Hoyer nominated for Majority Leader nominated unopposed
    • Assistant Minority Leader Ben Ray Lujan nominated for Majority Whip, 126-94 over Rep. Hakeem Jeffries
  • Republican Nomination - Speaker Steve Scalise nominated for Minority Leader, 161-49
    • Majority Leader Cathy McMorris Rodgers nominated for Minority Whip, 165-44

Democratic Leadership Team

  • Speaker - Jim Clyburn
  • Majority Leader - Steny Hoyer
  • Majority Whip - Ben Ray Lujan
  • Assistant Speaker of the House - Katherine Clark
  • Chair of the House Democratic Caucus - Hakeem Jeffries
    • Vice Chair of the House Democratic Caucus - Pete Aguilar
    • Deputy Chair, Junior Caucus - Joe Neguse
  • Chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee - Cheri Bustos
  • Co-Chairs, House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee - Matt Cartwright, Debbi Dingell, Ted Lieu, Doug Applegate, Beto O'Rourke, Jason Crow
  • Junior Caucus Representative - Collin Allred
  • Freshman Class Leadership Representative - Mondaire Jones
  • Co-Chairs of the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee - Sean Patrick Maloney, Barbara Lee, and Eric Swalwell
  • House Democratic Senior Chief Deputy Whips - G. K. Butterfield and Jan Schakowsky
  • House Democratic Chief Deputy Whips: Henry Cuellar, Sheila Jackson Lee, Dan Kildee, Stephanie Murphy, Jimmy Panetta, Terri Sewell, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and Peter Welch

2022

Pre-Election: 39D-25R-2I

  • Alabama - Katie Britt (R) def Will Boyd (D)
  • Alaska - Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) def. Kelly Tshibaka (R), Pat Chesbro (D), and Dr. Al Gross (I)
  • Arizona - Sen. Mark Kelly (D) def. Blake Masters (R)
  • Arkansas - Sen. John Boozman (R) def. Natalie James (D)
  • California - Sen. Kamala Harris (D) def. Mark Meuser (R)
  • Colorado - Sen. Michael Bennet (D) def. Joe O'Dea (R)
  • Connecticut - Fmr. State Sec. State Susan Bysiewicz (D) def. Leora Levy (R)
  • Florida - Sen. Marco Rubio (R) def. Fmr. Assistant Sec. Edu. Gwen Graham (D)
  • Georgia - Kelly Loeffler (R) def. Fmr. May. Teresa Tomlinson (D)
  • Hawaii - Sen. Brian Schatz (D) def. State Rep. Bob McDermott (R)
  • Idaho - Sen. Mike Crapo def. David Roth (D) and Scott Cleveland (I)
  • Illinois - Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D) def. Kathy Salvi (R)
  • Indiana - Sen. Todd Young (R) def. May. Thomas McDermott Jr. (D)
  • Iowa - Sen. Chuck Grassley (R) def. Michael Franken (D)
  • Kansas - Sen. Jerry Moran def. fmr. May. Mark Holland (D)
  • Kentucky - Sen. Rand Paul (R) def. fmr. State Rep. Charles Booker (D)
  • Louisiana - Sen. John Kennedy (R) def. Gary Chambers (D) and Luke Mixon (D)
  • Maryland - Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D) def. Chris Chaffee (R)
  • Missouri - Sen. Jason Kander (D) def. Fmr. Gov. Eric Greitens (R)
  • Nevada - Gov. Adam Laxalt (R) def. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D) (flip)
  • New Hampshire - Sen. Maggie Hassan (D) def. Gen. Don Bolduc (R)
  • New York - Sen. Chuck Schumer (D) def. Joe Pinion (R)
  • North Carolina - Laura Trump (R) def. State. Chief Just. Cheri Beasley (D)
  • North Dakota - Sen. John Hoeven (R) def. Rick Becker (I)
  • Ohio - Rep. Tim Ryan (D) def. fmr. State Tres. Josh Mandel (R) (flip)
  • Oklahoma - Sen. James Lankford (R) def. Madison Horn (D)
  • Oregon - Sen. Ron Wyden (D) def. Joe Rae Perkins (R)
  • Pennsylvania - Mehmet Oz (R) def. Sen. Katie McGinty (D) (flip)
  • South Carolina - Sen. Tim Scott (R) def. State Rep. Krystle Matthews
  • South Dakota - Sen. John Thune (R) def. Brian Bengs (D)
  • Utah - Sen. Mike Lee (R) def. Evan McMullin (I)
  • Vermont - Rep. Peter Welch (D) def. Gerald Malloy (R)
  • Washington - Sen. Patty Murray (D) def. Tiffany Smiley (R)
  • Wisconsin - Sen. Russ Feingold (D) def. Kevin Nicholson (R)

Final Count - 54D-44R-2I

2022 MA Gubernatorial Election

Democratic Primary

Candidates

Declared

  • Deval Patrick, former Attorney General of the United States and former Governor of Massachusetts

Potential

Declined